Flora & Fauna

Jim Corbett National Park

Flora

The Jim Corbett National Park is blessed with the natural bounty in the form of distinct flora which comprises of fresh water flora and alpine flora. Extent over an area of more than 521 square kilometers the Corbett has diverse floral count that is absolutely astonishing. The various habitat types of Corbett is occupied by Sal forests, Khair-Sisso forests, Mountains, Chaur, and rivers and streams that owes their distinct assemblage of plants. According to botanical survey of India Corbett has 600 species of plants – trees, shrubs, ferns, grass, climbers, herbs and bamboos. These many distinct varieties of plant kingdom makes the national park sought after wildlife destination for those who wish to relax from hectic schedule of working throughout the year.

Trees

The most visible trees found in Corbett are sal, khair and sissoo (see Habitats and Ecosystems). Many other species that contribute to the diversity, are found scattered throughout the park.All bamboos in a forest flower together at the same time once in several decades. After flowering, fruiting and dispersal of seeds, all individuals die together.

Chir pine (Pinus roxburghi)

Chir pine is the only conifer of the Park and is found on ridge-tops like Chir Choti but comes quite low in Gajar Sot. The upper reaches near Kanda have Banj Oak (Quercus leucotrichophora) growing which is essentially a Himalayan species.

Palms

include Khajur or Date-palm (Phoenix sp.) that occurs in open areas. Wallachia densiflora is a rare palm characteristic of Eastern Himalayas but is found in Corbett near Sultan. Kanju (Holoptelia integrifolia), Jamun (Syzygium cumini) and Aamla (Emblica officinalis) are found scattered throughout the lower areas while Tendu (Diospyros tomentosa) occurs in moist areas. Other major tree species are Bel (Aegle marmalos), Kusum (Schleichera oleosa), Mahua (Madhuca indica) and Bakli (Anogeissus latifolia).

Grasses

Corbett has over 70 grass speciesGrasses form the largest group of plant species in Corbett with more than 70 species recorded. They occupy different habitats, especially chaurs. They include Kansi (Saccharum sp.), Themeda arundinacea, Baib or Bhabar (Eulaliopsis binata), Narkul (Arundo donax), Tiger Grass (Thysanolaena maxima), Khus Khus (Vetiveria zizanioides), Cymbopogon flexuosus (a tufted grass with pleasant aromatic leaves), Aristida cyanantha (found amidst boulders), Neyraudia arundin acea (with light brown inflorescence) and Heteropagon contortus (Spear Grass with conspicuous sharp blades that adhere to clothes and penetrates skin).

Don’t forget to carry:

  • Camera
  • Video camera
  • Travelling clothes
  • Mobile
  • Travel bag

Founa

Corbett National Park is home for many wonderful as well as endangered species of animals. The natural bounty and vast landscapes provide perfect habitat for wildlife here. The park plays a dutiful shelter in preserving a variety of flora count.The park is an ideal home for many majestic animals like the Royal Bengal Tiger, Asiatic Elephant and many other wild animals. 

Tiger

Corbett has one of the highest densities of tigeINR The tiger (Panthera tigris) is perhaps the most celebrated of the wild animals of India. It is symbolises the power of Nature and finds an important place in our culture, mythology and legends. It has been worshiped as the guardian and ruler of the forest. Tigers are believed to have evolved in East Asia (China) about 2 million years ago. They then dispersed to other parts of Asia. There existed eight subspecies of tiger, out of which three have gone extinct. Today this perfect carnivore is a critically endangered species, though once it roamed freely in most of Asia. India is home to the largest population of wild tigers in the world. There are estimated to be only 5000 to 7500 tigers surviving in the world.

The Asian Elephant

The elephant, largest of the land mammals, has been an integral part of the history, mythology, tradition, culture and religion of India. There are three surviving species of elephants in the world, one in Asia and two in Africa. The Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is distributed in the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. Unlike the African species, Asian elephants have been domesticated for thousands of years and have been used in medieval warfare, for temples, and as a working animal.

Para or Hog Deer

(Axis porcinus) is the rarest of Corbett’s deer. It is closely related to the chital but is smaller in size. Unlike most other deer, the hog deer is not given to leaping over obstacles but instead, it escapes its predators by crouching low, ducking under obstacles. Its limbs are short and its hind legs are longer than the fore legs. This anatomy raises its rump to a higher level than the shoulders.

Other mammals

The Leopard (Panthera pardus) is the other large cat found in Corbett. Compared to the tiger leopards are smaller, more graceful and have a long agile body that has rosettes instead of stripes. It also has the ability to limb trees. Leopards are quite versatile, adaptable to a variety of terrains as well as to a broad range of prey that includes everything from insects and rodents up to large ungulates. Leopards mostly hunt during twilight hours and at night. They also ambush their prey by jumping down from trees.

Do not Forget

A well-planned travel is not only blissful but lingers fresh in the memory for a long time. One obviously would love a hassle-free travel, as it is meant for rest and enjoyment and above all to escape from the daily ordeal of life. If on a travel too, one finds oneself running from pillar to post and making last-minute arrangements, one would love to forget the holiday and the horrifying memories associated with it. India is a tough country, in terms of temperament and terrain. Before venturing on a sojourn to India, one needs to follow some simple guidelines to make the stay a pleasant one. Follow the tips in earnest and put your best foot forth and come to India with a desire, and India promises that you will leave the land with an ardent wish to come back again.

India Travel – Do’s and Don’ts

Follow these do’s and don’ts while you are traveling in India and you will remain out of any trouble hopefully.

Language – Make others understand what you are saying, speak slowly and repeat the things. Chances are that whatever you are saying is being misunderstood due to the differences in accent.

Permission for Photography – Take the necessary permissions and permits before photographing any government property, especially railways.

Beware – Never reply to a ‘hello’ of a common and never catch the eye of a professional beggar. Your simulated brutal indifference saves you energy and them time. No one pesters a hard touch when there are other tourists around.

Bargaining – Try to bargain as much possible, as most of the shopkeepers price the products well over the normal retail price.

Photography – Never buy camera film except from a recognized dealer. For places on higher altitude try using manual Indian cameras, as sophisticated automatic cameras might not be able to withstand extreme climates.

Beware of Dogs – Always give wide berth to the dogs that cross your path. The alternative may be two weeks of painful injections. Don’t run away or show fear to a stray dog or monkey, hold your ground and they will back off.

First Aid Kit – Don’t forget to keep the tablets of aspirin, paracetamol, and vitamins like the B-Complex. Check out with your doctor about the medicines you can use during your travel in India. Also try to keep in your first-aid kit, a pack of glucose powder, bandages, antiseptic creams or lotions, and Isabgol for abdominal problems.

Newspapers – Always buy a newspaper even if you are not going to read the news. They are very handy in relieving you of any boredom, work as a paper bag for shoes and fruits, help in stabilizing the rocking tables in a restaurant, sealing a window that rattles, swat flies, work as blotting paper, and will turn into paper airplanes.

Other Important Items – A small torch is an essential equipment as the lights are prone to power cuts. Always carry a small lock to double-lock the doors of the tourist bungalow or budget accommodation you are staying in. Also carry a string, if you have the urge to measure the length of everything in sight, an umbrella, which can be used as a walking stick, to scare off dogs, and to save yourself from raindrops.

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